Thursday, February 26, 2015

I wish I could let the poets speak for themselves here, but it would be impossible to recreate the impact of last night.
— Leah Binkovitz, Slow Food San Francisco

There is a passion that accompanies food: we can fall in love, have a torrid affair or need to take a break. Sometimes food affords a sensual satisfaction: aromatic chocolate, carrots with just the right sweet crunch, a juicy chicken leg, or that barbecued slab of ribs. At other times, we slice our food with intellectual cutlery when we consider its source or perhaps re-engage with motivations to eat a certain diet from paleo to vegan. 

In Defense of Food: A Spoken Word Affair showcases Bay Area spoken word artists performing pieces that tug at your emotional heartstrings - sometimes sad but often times hilarious - and echo your very sentiments regarding the ways you relate to the foods you love (or hate). Inspired by a piece entitled “Krispy Kreme,” performed by nationally-acclaimed poet, Poetri (who also was the Host of the first In Defense of Food at The sf|noir Wine & Food Festival in 2010), the spoken word artists this evening all speak about food in very different ways: its power to create and help define culture, how certain life experiences are shaped around the act of coming together to break bread, or the injustices found in people’s access to healthy and nutritious foods.

The evening will be hosted by Bryant Terry – a nationally acclaimed eco-chef, author and food-justice activist. A 2008-2010 Food and Society Policy Fellow, a national Program of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. Terry and his writing/recipes have been featured in Gourmet, Food and Wine, The New York Times Magazine, The San Francisco Chronicle, Vibe, Domino, Mothering, and many other publications. His most recent book is Afro-Vegan: Farm-Fresh African, Caribbean, and Southern Flavors Remixed, which was published in April 2014. Bryant will be available to sign books for the audience.

This evening is presented in conjunction with the Museum of the African Diaspora.

Bryant Terry knows that good food should be an everyday right and not a privilege.
— Alice Waters

Hosted by: Bryant Terry - Chef, Educator, Author and Food Justice Activist

 

A piece performed by spoken word artist, Josh Healey, at the first In Defense of Food at the Museum of the African Diaspora during The sf|noir Wine & Food Festival in 2010. Josh skillfully describes the complexities that intersect food and culture and provides a humorous look at the complicated ways culture and identity evolve through our personal connections and exchange.

Thursday, February 26, 2015
7:00PM-10:00PM
Museum of the African Diaspora